GCI Discussion Papers

GCI Discussion Paper No.6Clean Energy Discussion Paper No. 6
Projecting Solar PV Yield of the Solar Array Installed at UQ Gatton Campus Using NREL’s SAM Model (PDF) 2 MB

Abstract
The viability of utility scale solar PV farms will depend critically upon the annual production of such farms. A crucial determinant of solar PV yield will be prevailing solar irradiance and weather conditions.  In Australia, the combined effects of weather relating to solar irradiance, temperature and rainfall on PV yield is likely to be closely linked to the El NiƱo–Southern Oscillation ENSO cycle. To investigate this we use NREL’s SAM model to simulate electricity production from a 3.275 megawatt pilot solar PV plant at the University of Queensland’s Gatton Campus. A key finding was that the best simulated PV yields were obtained during 2013 and 2014 when ENSO neutral conditions but with an El Nino bias prevailed. The worst years were 2010 and 2011 which were characterised by moderate and weak La Nina phases of ENSO. All other years considered had average PV yield outcomes including 2015 which experienced a very strong El Nino event.


Clean Energy Discussion Paper No. 5
Assessment of the Comparative Productive Performance of Three Solar PV Technologies Installed at UQ Gatton Campus Using The NREL SAM Model (PDF) 2.6 MB

Abstract
The economic assessment of the viability of different types of solar PV tracking technologies centres on assessment of whether the annual production of the different tracking technologies is increased enough to compensate for the higher cost of installation and operational expenditures incurred by the tracking systems. To investigate this issue, we use the NREL’s SAM model to simulate electricity production from three representative solar PV systems installed at Gatton. In these simulations we use hourly solar irradiance, weather and surface albedo data, technical data relating to both module and inverter characteristics and impacts associated with module soiling and near-object shading. A key finding was that over the period 2007 to 2015, average increases in annual production of between 23.9 and 24.3 per cent and 38.0 and 39.1 per cent were obtained for Single Axis and Dual Axis tracking systems relative to the Fixed Tilt system.


Levelised Cost of Energy (LCOE) of Three Solar PV Technologies Installed at UQ Gatton CampusClean Energy Discussion Paper No. 4
Levelised Cost of Energy (LCOE) of Three Solar PV Technologies Installed at UQ Gatton Campus (PDF) 2.8 MB

Abstract
Economic assessment of the viability of different types of solar PV tracking technologies centres on assessment of whether the annual production of the different tracking technologies is increased enough relative to a benchmark Fixed Tilt system to compensate for the higher cost of installation and operation incurred by the tracking systems. To investigate this issue, we calculated the LCOE of three representative solar PV systems. These calculations depend crucially on assumptions made about ($/kW) construction costs as well as annual capacity factors of the three solar technologies considered. A key finding was that the Single Axis Tracking technology was the most cost competitive, followed by a Fixed Tilt system. A Dual Axis Tracking system was the least cost competitive technology of those considered. We also considered how LCOE could underpin a ‘Contract-for-Difference’ feed-in tariff scheme.


Clean Energy Discussion Paper No. 3
Comparative Productive Performance of Three Solar PV Technologies Installed at UQ Gatton Campus (PDF) 3 MB

Abstract
Economic assessment of the viability of different types of solar PV tracking technologies centres on assessment of whether the annual production of the different tracking technologies is increased enough relative to a benchmark Fixed Tilt system to compensate for the higher installation and operational costs incurred by the tracking systems. To investigate this issue, we use the PVsyst software to simulate electricity production from three representative solar PV systems installed at Gatton. In these simulations we use hourly solar irradiance, weather and surface albedo data, technical data relating to both module and inverter characteristics and impacts associated with module soiling and shading. A key finding was that over the period 2007 to 2015, average increases in simulated annual production of between 17.7 and 17.9 per cent and 36.5 and 36.7 per cent were obtained for Single-Axis and Dual-Axis tracking systems relative to the Fixed Tilt system.


Sustainable Water Discussion Paper No. 2
Achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals for water and beyond (Sep 2016) PDF 2MB

This University of Queensland discussion paper from the Water for Equity and Wellbeing Initiative was developed to consider Australia’s efforts to achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals in Australia, and within the broader Asia-Pacific region.

 

 


discussion paper

Sustainable Water Discussion Paper No. 1
The UN Sustainable Development Goals for Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: How Should Australia Respond Within and Beyond its Borders. (July 2016)

Australia is positioned next to south-east Asia, where one billion people lack access to adequate sanitation facilities. Only half the population in the Pacific Island countries have access to such facilities, while poor hygiene and unsanitary living conditions have contributed to children in remote Australian Aboriginal communities experiencing a higher rate of common infectious diseases than in large urban communities.

 

 


Clean Energy Discussion Paper No. 2
Delivering a Competitive Australian Power System (Nov 2011)

Due to its reliance on fossil fuels, Australia’s power system is now among the least resilient of its global competitors. The three part series, “delivering a competitive Australian power system” seeks to address this issue. In this, the first installment, we compare the strategic direction of Australia’s power system to other resource-rich countries.

 

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