19 September 2014
Nukunonu Atoll seaside, one of the regions of the world vulnerable to the impact of the climate change. Photo courtesy of UN/Ariane Rummery.
Nukunonu Atoll seaside, one of the regions of the world vulnerable to the impact of the climate change. Photo courtesy of UN/Ariane Rummery.

Sea level rise maps are a valuable tool for policymakers but may not sufficiently communicate uncertainties inherent in spatial data, UQ researchers have found.

Published in Environmental Science and Policy last week, UQ researchers with the Australian Sea Level Rise Partnership have developed a new set of principles to guide policymakers working with the challenge of variability in physical, geographical and biological processes in coastal regions.

With sea level rise over the 21st century threatening coastal communities worldwide, significant land-use policy reform will be needed to mitigate exposure to coastal hazards.

Lead researcher Justine Bell from UQ’s School of Law and GCI’s Megan Saunders, Javier Leon, Morena Mills and Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, say that following this new framework will help future coastal planning policies overcome the uncertainties associated with sea level rise.

Read the paper here.

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