24 July 2017
Robyn Williams AM has been a member of the UQ Global Change Institute Advisory Board since its inception in 2010.
Robyn Williams AM has been a member of the UQ Global Change Institute Advisory Board since its inception in 2010.

As well as being one of Australia’s longest-serving broadcasters, Robyn Williams AM now has another accolade to add to his already impressive lifelong list of achievements.

Last Friday, The University of Queensland conferred Robyn Williams with an Honorary Doctorate in recognition of his exemplary contribution to the community as both a broadcaster and passionate advocate for science and discovery.

The program synonymous with the name “Robyn Williams” for more than 40 years, the ABC’s Science Show, continues to be one of the most influential science reports anywhere in the world.

GCI Director Professor Ove Hoegh-Guldberg said Robyn has made an enormous contribution to science by distilling the excitement and relevance of science into a language that most could comprehend.

“I don’t know of any other science communicator who can do this so well,” Professor Hoegh-Guldberg said.

“After 2000 episodes of the top-shelf science series The Science Show, one can only view Robyn as super human!

“To think I listened to his show when I was a teenager (and now I am 58!) just boggles the mind. And he is still going!”

Robyn has conducted countless interviews with scientists on ABC TV on programs such as Quantum and Catalyst, narrated the Nature of Australia series and appeared in World Safari with David Attenborough.

As a member of the UQ Global Change Institute Advisory Board since its inception in 2010, Robyn has provided strategic counsel and guidance that is helping ensure positive change in the areas of climate change, technological innovation and global population growth.

Although he joined the ABC Science Unit in 1972, Robyn’s contributions have not been confined to broadcasting.

An adjunct professor at The University of Queensland, Robyn has written more than 10 books; served as president of the Australian Museum Trust; chair of the Commission for the Future, and president of Australian Science Communicators. He is a National Living Treasure (1997) and was the first journalist to be elected a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science (1993).

He has other honorary doctorates of science from the University of New South Wales, University of South Australia, Deakin University, University of Sydney and Macquarie University, and an Honorary Doctorate of Law from ANU. He even has a star in the constellation Carina named after him.

After completing his Bachelor of Science (Honours) in London, Robyn spent as much time acting as he did studying.  Early in his career he made guest appearances in The Goodies, Monty Python's Flying Circus and Doctor Who – and once replaced Tom Jones for four months in his TV series.

A Reuters fellowship at Oxford University allowed him time to write his autobiography, ‘And Now for Something Completely Different’.  He was a visiting fellow at Balliol College Oxford in 1995-96.


 

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